The Chile Growing Season: Mulching and Irrigation

DaveGardening/FarmingLeave a Comment

Acres planted watermelon, which is covered with plastic and watered with PVC pipe.
Share this PostShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on RedditEmail this to someone

After transplanting, the pepper plants seem to sit and do nothing for a few weeks. Although they may not seem to be growing very fast, they are putting out roots and preparing for an enormous surge of growth. Sometimes there will be leaf damage from the sun and wind until the plants totally adapt to being in the ground. To do that, they need mulch and irrigation. Mulch is any material applied over the surface of the soil to retard the growth of weeds, conserve soil moisture, maintain a uniform soil temperature, and improve the appearance of the garden. There is no doubt that mulches increase the yield of pepper plants. Some pepper gardeners are fortunate to live in areas where the only water needed for the garden comes from rainfall. But most gardeners will have to irrigate their moisture-demanding peppers. Gardeners should adjust the frequency and amount of watering to rainfall cycles. In other words, do not irrigate if there has just been a heavy downpour. Read my entire article here.